FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

  1. Why should I give blood?
  2. Do you really need me?
  3. What are the minimum requirements to donate?
  4. How long does it take to donate blood?
  5. How will I feel after I donate blood?
  6. How quickly does my body replace the blood I donate?
  7. How often can I donate blood?
  8. What happens to my blood after I donate?
  9. Can I get AIDS or any other disease from donating?

EXCUSES FOR NOT DONATING:

  1. No one ever asked me to donate
  2. I am too young
  3. I am too old
  4. I don’t have enough iron in my blood/I’m anemic
  5. I already gave this year
  6. I am too busy; it will take too much time
  7. I am worried about the AIDS test results
  8. I have high blood pressure
  9. I do not weigh enough
  10. I am nervous about giving blood
  11. I cannot possibly spare a pint of blood; I’ll be too weak
  12. I might get a disease from donating blood
  13. You wouldn’t want my blood because of the illness I’ve had
  14. My insurance covers the blood I might need
  15. My type is not the right type

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  1. Why should I give blood?
    Because your pint of blood can save as many as three lives. Medical technology has provided many lifesaving discoveries over the years, but there is still no substitute for human blood. In a medical emergency, often the most important element is the availability of blood.
  2. Do you really need me?
    Lane Blood Center services three area hospitals requiring us to collect 80 units of blood every day to meet their needs. To maintain a sufficient blood supply for every patient in those hospitals, new and repeat donors are essential.
  3. What are the minimum requirements to become a blood donor?
    You must be at least 16 years old, weigh a minimum of 110 pounds and be in good health. Check Eligibility for other basic requirements.
  4. How long does it take to donate blood?
    Plan on spending 45-minutes to an hour for your donation appointment. See Donating Whole Blood for more information.
  5. How will I feel after I donate blood?
    Most donors feel fine, especially knowing that they have helped to save a life. All donors must eat a good protein meal and drink liquids (water and juice) within two hours before donating. If you do feel light-headed after giving blood, a snack and juice will help you recover within a few minutes. It is important that you eat well and drink plenty of fluids during the next 24 hours.
  6. How quickly does my body replace the blood I donate?
    Your blood volume is replaced within a few hours. Plasma is restored following a meal. Your red cells replace themselves more slowly, usually in about 4-8 weeks.
  7. How often can I donate blood?
    You can donate blood every 56 days.
  8. What happens to my blood after I donate?
    Your blood will be tested for various infectious agents, including HIV and hepatitis. It will then be processed into components (red cells, platelets, plasma). After processing, red cells can be stored for 42 days, platelets for five days, and plasma can be frozen for one year. Your single unit of blood can help up to three separate patients.
  9. Can I get AIDS or any other disease from donating blood?
    It is IMPOSSIBLE to get AIDS or any other disease from donating blood. A one-time disposable needle is used to collect blood. It remains in a sealed sterile casing attached to a collection bag until the time your donation is made. The needle is discarded immediately after use.

EXCUSES FOR NOT DONATING

  1. No one ever asked me to donate: Consider yourself invited. There are no substitutes for human blood. Your donation could help two or three different patients.
  2. I am too young: If you are at least 16 years old you can become a blood donor.
  3. I am too old: There is no upper age limit! If you are in good health and feeling well, you may donate.
  4. I don’t have enough iron in my blood/I’m anemic: A sample of your blood is checked for iron level before you donate. If you are deferred for low iron this is a temporary deferral and we hope you’ll attempt to donate blood again in the near future. For more information about iron requirements click here.
  5. I already gave this year: You can donate blood every eight weeks, up to six times per year.
  6. I am too busy. It will take too much time to give blood: Donating takes less the ten minutes, the entire visit less than an hour.
  7. I am worried about the AIDS test results: If you are healthy and do not engage in high-risk behavior, the possibility of having a positive AIDS test result is very small. All test results are highly confidential, released only with consent of the donor or as required by law.
  8. I have high blood pressure: If you have high blood pressure, you should see your doctor and get it under control with medication. Once your pressure is under control, you can donate blood, even if on high blood pressure medication.
  9. I do not weigh enough: If you weigh 110 pounds or more, you can become a blood donor.
  10. I am nervous about giving blood: That is normal. Almost everyone feels that way the first time. Once you realize how easy it is, you will wonder why you waited so long.
  11. I cannot possibly spare a pint of blood; it will make me too weak: No it won’t. The average adult has 8-12 pints of blood. You replace the fluid part of your blood within 24 hours of donating. Your donation should not affect your daily routine.
  12. I might get a disease from donating blood: All equipment is sterile, brand new, and disposed of after use. You cannot get any disease from donating blood.
  13. You would not want my blood because of the illness I have had: If you have some doubts, check with your physician or call Lane Blood Center at (541) 484-9111 to talk with a nurse. Many illnesses such as cold and flu require you to be temporarily deferred.
  14. My insurance covers the blood I might need: Insurance policies cover the fees for collection and transfusion, but only volunteer blood donors can supply the blood you need.
  15. My type is not the right type: Every type is the right type. All types, especially common ones like O Positive and A Positive, are needed by patients all the time.